Pets and Animals

History of Doberman Pinscher Dogs

Buying and Selling Doberman Pinschers

Prior to buying or selling Dobermans, 5 steps should be considered:

• Find a responsible breeder/owner.
• Discuss and discover any genetic issues.
• Visit the puppies and observe their character.
• Puppies should be kept indoors so that they are familiar with everyday
happenings.
• Learn as much as you can about the breed.

Origins of the Doberman Breed

The Doberman Pinscher breed is traced back to a German gentleman named Herr Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann. Herr Dobermann was born in 1834 and died in 1891. He spent his life as a tax collector and dogcatcher. He was also a night watchman, which may explain his specific demands for the characteristics he wanted in a dog.

There were different types of dogs with varying characteristics, but Herr Dobermann knew he wanted a specific kind of dog. He sought a protective watchdog with intelligence and a good nose. He wanted his dog to be sharp, not fearful, and naturally protective.

In Herr Dobermann’s time, it is said there were no pure dogs. Many different types of dogs were crossbred, but no one knows for certain what types of dogs Herr Dobermann bred. People referred to Herr Dobermann’s dogs as “Dobermann’s Hunde.” These dogs carried great skills for hunting, biting and killing rodents. The viciousness of the Pinschers was so bad that you had to be brave to even own one.

Levels of Aggression
The level of aggression must be considered when purchasing or selling a Doberman. There are 4 different levels of aggression:

• Aggression Directed at Strangers
• Aggression Directed at the Owner
• Aggression Directed at Strange Dogs
• Aggression Directed at Other Household Dogs

Typically the Doberman is ranked high with aggression towards strangers and very low with aggression towards its owner.

Herr Dobermann had a dog by the name of Schnuppe. Schnuppe was a grey color with a smooth coat. Schnuppe was also a fearless dog. Herr Dobermann mated Schnuppe with another dog, named Bismark, also known as Bismart. Bismark was very protective. Her puppies were distinctive because they were born with black fur and rust-color markings.

The Doberman Bloodline

Over the years, people have studied and researched the origin of the Doberman breed and the conclusions are still a little hairy. Many people seem to agree the lineage of the Doberman breed includes a type of sheep dog and a German Pinscher. However, in 1901, a German canine authority, Richard Strebel, advised he doubted the Doberman was a true Pinscher. Some people believe the Doberman should be called a sheep dog.

In 1933, it was decided by the German Dobermann Club that the main lineage of the Doberman is the German Pinscher. Then in 1947 a gentleman by the name of Philip Gruenig advised the Doberman and German Pinscher do not have similar body types or behavior patterns. In regards to the body differences, the German Pinschers were relatively short. Gruenig said it is impossible to get 30 centimeters more in height in 30 years of crossbreeding. The average shoulder height of the German Pinscher was 40 centimeters. Nonetheless, in 2012 and 2013, the American Kennel Club in the US has ranked the Doberman as the twelfth most popular pure-breed.

Introduction of the Doberman

Herr Dobermann was 29 years old when he introduced the Doberman Pinschers in 1863. He sold the dogs in Apolda Germany. The dogs became so successful in the market that the city of Apolda recorded the Doberman Pinscher introduction to the dog market in its history. In 1890, the German Kennel Club wrote and approved the Standard for the Doberman Pinscher breed. Even today, the Standard is the same.

However, there were dogs similar to the Doberman that had already existed prior to the introduction of the Doberman Pinschers. These dogs were known as the Thueringen breed. The Thueringen breed was popular to Alpoda. Their bloodline consisted of crossbreeding the German Pinchers and Sheepdogs.

Change in Doberman Pinscher Breed

The oldest Doberman Pinscher parent dogs recorded in the German stud book are Bosco in 1893 and Caesi in 1894. In addition to Herr Dobermann’s Schnuppe, there were 3 other male dogs and 4 female dogs used in breeding. From these dogs come the germ cells used in breeding today. The intent for breeding the Doberman Pinchers was to get a great dog that could be used for police and military work.

Doberman Breed Population Restart

Doberman breeding did very well in 1909. Most of the breeding took place in Dusseldorf Germany. However, the years 1914-1918 show WWI killed many of the Doberman Pinschers. Basically the breed’s population had to be started again – this time using Dobermans named Burschel and Simmenau. The combination of these dogs created extremely sharp and vicious Dobermans.

It was not until 1920 that the Dobermans were exported internationally. During this year a 5-year-old Doberman was sold to the United States. The Dobermans were used as official combat dogs for the US in World War II. They were used as messengers, guards, and scouts. The US was not the only country to receive a Doberman. Another dog was sold to Czechoslovakia, which helped to stabilize the Doberman population there.

The Doberman Today

Today the Doberman is very common. Breeding technics have created a Doberman that is less vicious but still very sharp and intelligent. They are now even more suitable as companions. The breed name is spelled Dobermann or Doberman Pinscher. The nicknames used around the world are:

Dobermann
Dobie
Dobynm

The average weight is 75-100 pounds for a male and 60-90 pounds for a female. The average height is 27.5 inches for a male and 25.5 inches for the female. Their coats are short and colors are brown, black, blue, red, fawn, and albino. The Doberman life expectancy is 10-13 years. If you are looking for Doberman dogs/puppies for sale, search under Pets & Animals on Tonaton.com.

Receive Updates

No spam guarantee.

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button
Close
Close